Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens)

BACKGROUND:
Prognostic markers for dogs with thyroid tumors are limited.

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES:
To identify clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical prognostic factors for dogs with thyroid tumors.

ANIMALS:
Seventy dogs with thyroid neoplasia.

METHODS:
Retrospective study. Dogs with thyroid neoplasia were included when follow-up information and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples were available. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, Ki-67, and E-cadherin. Correlation of tumor variables (diameter, volume, localization, scintigraphic uptake, thyroid function, IHC) with local invasiveness and metastatic disease was performed on all tumor samples. Forty-four dogs treated by thyroidectomy were included in a survival analysis.
RESULTS:
Fifty dogs (71%) had differentiated follicular cell thyroid carcinoma (dFTC) and 20 (29%) had medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). At diagnosis, tumor diameter (P = .007; P = .038), tumor volume (P = .020), tumor fixation (P = .002), ectopic location (P = .002), follicular cell origin (P = .044), and Ki-67 (P = .038) were positively associated with local invasiveness; tumor diameter (P = .002), tumor volume (P = .023), and bilateral location (P = .012) were positively associated with presence of distant metastases. Forty-four dogs (28 dFTC, 16 MTC; stage I-III) underwent thyroidectomy. Outcome was comparable between dogs with dFTC and MTC. Macroscopic (P = .007) and histologic (P = .046) vascular invasion were independent negative predictors for disease-free survival. Although time to presentation, histologic vascular invasion and Ki-67 were negatively associated with time to metastases, and time to presentation was negatively associated with time to recurrence, no independent predictors were found. E-cadherin expression was not associated with outcome.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:
Prognostic factors have been identified that provide relevant information for owners and clinicians.

Cats Are No Match for New York City’s Rats

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