Dog and cat owners already know their companion animals seem to loathe the ‘cone of shame’ they are required to wear after surgery or when they have a sore or itchy spot. But very little research has been done to assess the cone’s impact on animal welfare.

Now a new study by researchers in the Sydney School of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney has found the cone, or the “Elizabethan collar’ as it’s known in vet circles, does indeed impact on an animal’s quality of life—owners, too.

The study, undertaken by Doctor of Veterinary Medicine student Yustina Shenoda and supervisors in the Sydney School of Veterinary Science, and published in the journal Animals, surveyed owners about the collar’s impact on their pet’s sleep, eating, drinking, exercise, interactions with other animals and overall quality of life.

Owners reported the collar interferes with drinking and playing and can cause injuries or irritation to the animal. It can also cause injuries to their owners and damage to property.

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